November 19, 2015

Published in ROAR Magazine

In the wake of the Paris attacks fingers were pointed in all directions, but few were directed at France itself. What has radicalized the French youth?

The deadly attacks in Paris on the night of Friday, November 13, were quickly met by a global rush of solidarity with France and the French people. From world leaders expressing their sympathies, to raising the French flag on buildings across the globe, and more visibly, on Facebook profiles, everyone stood unequivocally united with France.

The sentiment of solidarity behind this mass concern is heart-warming, however it must come hand in hand with a demand for a serious debate on matters of terrorism, violence and war. Rage and sadness should not hinder our ability to think.

Why Paris? Who were the attackers, and how...

October 14, 2014

Published in Global South Development Magazine.

On Sunday 12 Oct 2014, Bolivians voted to re-elect Evo Morales Ayma, Bolivia’s incumbent president, with an overwhelming 60%. Morales has indeed gained widespread popular support through his anti-imperialist and socialist policies, with even the World Bank forced to recognise the successes of his social programmes. His government has fallen short, however, of the revolutionary promises it was first elected on. That is why, it is important to ask, how far do Morales’ reforms truly go?

The Promises of a Grassroot Socialist Leader

His widespread popularity stems from his poor and indigenous background, and his symbolic role in the anti-imperialist and anti-neoliberal popular uprisings of the 2000s. Morales first became known for leading the coca fa...

May 29, 2013

Published on Collective Development.

MORALES EXPELS USAID ON MAY DAY

Since ascending to power in 2006, Evo Morales has made it a yearly tradition to nationalise a foreign owned company on Labour Day, usually within high-profit sectors such as gas, oil or telecommunications. This year, the president declared another major political announcement: the expulsion of USAID from Bolivia. “Brothers and sisters, they (the USA) surely think that they can still manipulate us politically and economically, but that was then. […] never again will USAID manipulate us, will use our leaders and our compatriots on the basis of charity”. Morales’ argument was that the US development body was more often than not acting with political objectives rather than social ones, and that their presence in the country mir...

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© Clara Veale